The Skin-Gut Connection: How Our Microbiome Affects the Skin & Why You Need A Probiotic Supplement The Skin Gut Connection How Our Microbiome Affects the Skin Why You Need A Probiotic Supplement 2

The Skin-Gut Connection: How Our Microbiome Affects the Skin & Why You Need A Probiotic Supplement

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You may not have realized it, but your gut health is closely connected to your skin health. In fact, the gut microbiome can play a role in the development of conditions like acne, rosacea, and eczema. If you’re having skin problems that just won’t go away, it’s worth taking a closer look at your gut health and making changes. In this article, we’ll discuss the gut-skin connection and share some tips on improving your gut health and getting clear skin!

The gut microbiome consists of trillions of bacteria, fungi, and viruses in our digestive tract. These microbes play a crucial role in keeping us healthy by helping to break down food, produce vitamins, and protect the gut from harmful bacteria. The gut microbiome also plays a role in immunity and inflammation. When the gut microbiome is out of balance, it can lead to inflammation throughout the body, including the skin.

What is the gut-skin axis?

The gut-skin axis is the connection between the gut and the skin. The gut microbiome consists of trillions of bacteria that play a role in digestion, metabolism, and immunity. When the gut microbiome is out of balance, it can lead to inflammation and skin problems.

The functioning of your gut microbiome is intrinsically linked to the health and function of your skin, which can be regulated by diet or other factors. The bacteria that live in us are integral parts when it comes to down-regulating epithelial cell turnover rates (a key factor for healing) as well as hydration level control; they also affect how fast wounds heal themselves while influencing what types if microorganisms thrive on them at any given time – all this affects how we look externally!

 

Improve your gut health and get clear skin

There are several things you can do to improve your gut health and get clear skin:

  • Eat a healthy diet: Eating a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and probiotic-rich foods like yogurt can help promote a healthy gut microbiome. Avoiding processed foods, sugar, and dairy can also help.

  • Take probiotics: Probiotics are live microorganisms that can help promote a healthy gut microbiome. They’re found in supplements and fermented foods like yogurt, sauerkraut, and kimchi.

  • Reduce stress: Stress can lead to gut problems like leaky gut syndrome, which can trigger inflammation and skin problems. Managing stress with relaxation techniques like yoga or meditation can help keep the gut healthy.

How can an unhealthy gut biome negatively impact our skin?

The gut microbiome consists of trillions of bacteria that play a role in digestion, metabolism, and immunity. When the gut microbiome is out of balance, it can lead to inflammation and skin problems. An unhealthy gut biome can cause inflammation throughout the body, including the skin.

This inflammation can lead to acne, rosacea, eczema, and psoriasis. In addition, an imbalance in the gut microbiome can also disrupt the skin’s barrier function, leading to dryness and sensitivity. This inflammation can lead to acne, rosacea, eczema, and psoriasis. In addition, an imbalance in the gut microbiome can also disrupt the skin’s barrier function, leading to dryness and sensitivity.

Can gut-related conditions have an impact on the skin as well?

Yes, gut-related conditions like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis can also lead to skin problems. These conditions are often associated with inflammation, triggering or worsening skin conditions. In addition, gut disorders can also disrupt the skin’s barrier function, leading to dryness and sensitivity.

How can prebiotics, probiotics, and postbiotics help our gut and, ultimately, our skin?

Prebiotics are food for probiotics (the good bacteria in our gut). Probiotics help to keep the gut microbiome balanced and support a healthy immune system. Postbiotics are the by-products of probiotic bacteria and are also thought to be beneficial for gut health. All three of these – prebiotics, probiotics, and postbiotics – can help to improve gut health and ultimately lead to healthier skin.

Studies have shown that prebiotics, probiotics, and postbiotics can help improve gut health by reducing inflammation, relieving symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), improving immune function, and protecting against infection. In one study, prebiotic supplementation was found to improve the skin barrier function in people with eczema. Another study found that a probiotic supplement containing Lactobacillus paracasei helped to reduce acne vulgaris lesions.

Add prebiotics, probiotics, and postbiotics to your diet in many different ways. You can find prebiotics in foods such as bananas, onions, garlic, leeks, asparagus, and oats. Probiotics are found in yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, kimchi and tempeh. Postbiotics can be found in fermented foods such as kombucha, miso, and natto. You can also take supplements containing prebiotics, probiotics or postbiotics.

What are the best foods to eat for a healthy gut biome?

You can support gut health with diet and supplements in a few different ways. Some gut-friendly foods include fermented foods like yogurt, kimchi, sauerkraut, and tempeh. These foods contain live cultures that can help restore gut microbiome balance. In addition, try to incorporate plenty of high-fiber fruits, vegetables, and whole grains into your diet. These gut-friendly foods can help to reduce inflammation and promote a healthy gut microbiome.

You may also want to consider taking supplements for gut health. Probiotics, zinc, berberine, and omega-three fatty acids benefit gut health. Please consult a doctor or healthcare professional before changing your diet or supplement routine.

What to look for in a probiotic supplement?

When choosing a probiotic supplement, looking for one with live and active cultures is essential. In addition, you want to ensure that the probiotic supplement you choose is third-party certified and backed by science. Finally, choose a probiotic supplement tailored to your specific needs.

Our Top Picks

The skin-gut connection is the relationship between the microbiome, the collection of microorganisms that live in and on our bodies, and our skin health. Studies have shown that the gut microbiome’s composition can affect the skin’s health and appearance, including conditions such as acne, eczema, and rosacea.

Probiotic supplements are a way to support the gut microbiome and improve overall health, including skin health. Many probiotic supplements are available on the market, and each one may have a different formulation of beneficial bacteria and other ingredients.

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Editors Pick: Seed DS-01™ Daily Synbiotic at Seed.com ($50)

Seed DS-01™ Daily Synbiotic at Seed.com is the Editor’s Pick for the best probiotic supplement. It has a comprehensive formula of 24 clinically studied probiotic strains and prebiotic fibers that work together to improve gut health and overall wellness. It has a proprietary delivery system that protects the probiotic bacteria and has been clinically shown to improve gut health markers, and digestion, reduce bloating, and improve immune function. It is also vegan, gluten-free, non-GMO, and eco-friendly.

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Best Overall: Pendulum ($60)

Pendulum is the Best Overall probiotic supplement for people with type 2 diabetes. It contains a single strain of bacteria, Akkermansia muciniphila, which has been clinically shown to improve glucose metabolism and reduce inflammation. It is designed to be taken with a low-carbohydrate diet, is vegan, gluten-free, and non-GMO, and is manufactured using a patented fermentation process for quality and purity.

Pendulum Akkermansia

Akkermansia includes live Akkermansia – a next generation beneficial strain that is essential for gut health. Now available exclusively from Pendulum as a daily probiotic.


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Best Combination: Ritual Synbiotic+ for Gut Health ($50)

Ritual Synbiotic+ for Gut Health is the Best Combination for probiotics because it combines prebiotics and probiotics in a carefully balanced formula. It has 11 clinically studied probiotic strains and prebiotic fibers to nourish beneficial bacteria. The delayed-release capsule ensures the probiotics reach the lower intestines, and it’s vegan, gluten-free, non-GMO, and sustainably produced.

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3-in-1 clinically-studied prebiotics, probiotics and postbiotic to support a balanced gut microbiome.*

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Best Complete: Sakara Complete Probiotic ($46)

Sakara Complete Probiotic is the Best Combination for the best complete probiotic supplement due to its carefully crafted blend of probiotics, prebiotics, and digestive enzymes. It includes 13 clinically studied probiotic strains, prebiotic fibers, and digestive enzymes that support gut health, boost immune function and improve overall well-being. The supplement is vegan, gluten-free, non-GMO, and manufactured sustainably.

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Best On-The-Go: GRO WELL Hair Boost Supplement Powder + Probiotic from Vegamour ($68)

GRO WELL Hair Boost Supplement Powder + Probiotic from Vegamour is the Best On-The-Go for probiotics as it contains Bifidobacterium lactis, a clinically proven probiotic strain, and a blend of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and other hair health-promoting ingredients. Its powder formula is convenient and easy to use, making it a perfect option for busy individuals who want to support their overall health while on-the-go.

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Best Budget Friendly: Rae Wellness Pre+ Probiotic ($15)

This budget-friendly supplement contains probiotic bacteria and prebiotic fiber to support gut health and overall well-being. It is also vegan, gluten-free, and non-GMO.

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Conclusion

If you’re struggling with gut health, don’t despair – there are plenty of ways to improve gut health and get clear skin! By including probiotic-rich foods in your diet, taking supplements, and avoiding gut-irritating foods, you can achieve a healthy gut microbiome that will lead to clear skin. Try these tips and see how gut health can impact your skin! Just remember, gut health is important for overall health, so it’s worth getting it right!

As always, please consult with a doctor or healthcare professional before changing your diet or supplement routine. Thanks for reading!


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The article was first published October 2022 and updated by our editors July 2023

Hi, I’m Valerie!

I'm an Integrative Nutrition Health Coach and Registered Yoga Teacher (RYT-200), offering guidance to high achievers in aligning their lifestyle with well-being through daily wellness and self-care routines, promoting balance and harmony. Join me at Wellness Bum for tips on living well, and consider subscribing to my newsletter or booking a coaching session.