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Gut Microbiome Foods: 9 Seasonal Choices

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May is finally here, and you know what that means – it’s time to celebrate Digestive Health Month! I’m sure you all know by now just how important our gut health is to our overall well-being, but did you know that maintaining a healthy gut requires good inputs? Think: how your diet and probiotics (????????????) impact your outputs (????). What we eat plays a vital role in the health of our gut microbiome, and that’s where Seed Daily comes in.

Seed Daily is dedicated to educating people about the importance of digestive health and how to maintain a healthy gut microbiome. And to make things even better, they’re offering a month-long sale of 20% off Seed Daily products with the code VALERIEA20. How fabulous is that?

So, let’s talk about 9 Spring Inputs to Nurture Your Microbiome. These foods are packed with nutrients and can do wonders for your gut health. But that’s not all – we’re also going to dive into the importance of eating seasonally and how it can improve your gut health. Get ready to nourish your body from the inside out because we’re about to get into some seriously good stuff!

IN THIS ARTICLE

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    Eating Seasonally: A Microbiome-Friendly Diet

    Seasonal variation in the gut microbiome has been observed, with dietary fluctuations across the seasons potentially explaining these shifts. With modern living and access to produce year-round, our gut bacteria may not be as dynamic as they were for our hunter-gatherer ancestors. This raises the question: Could eating seasonally restore some of the cyclical shifts we once had and improve our ability to utilize what we consume?

    Spring brings a bounty of delicious fresh produce that benefits our gut health. Here are some of the top Spring foods to include in your diet:

    Radishes for Bile Regulation

    Radishes are high in fiber, which helps regulate bile production. They are also rich in antioxidants, zinc, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, copper, calcium, iron, folic acid, flavonoids, and manganese.

    Asparagus for Prebiotics and Anti-Inflammatory Processes

    Asparagus is naturally rich in prebiotic substances and particularly high in insoluble fiber, which supports regular bowel movements. Asparagus contains soluble fiber, which acts as fuel for your gut microbes through fermentation. This fermentation process releases short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) that provide important anti-inflammatory processes in your body.

    Peas for Heart and Gut Health

    Peas protect heart and gut health and are a good alternative source of protein and iron, especially in a plant-based diet.

    Cabbage for Vitamins and Antioxidants

    Red cabbage is rich in vitamins C and E, carotenoids, flavonoids, and anthocyanins. Vitamin C aids cell and immune function, supports collagen formation, boosts iron absorption, and promotes healthy skin. Vitamin E has anti-inflammatory properties, supports immune function, and reduces the risk of chronic diseases like heart disease. The anthocyanins in red cabbage have demonstrated antioxidant activity in vitro.

    Arugula for Nutrients and Phytochemicals

    Dark green vegetables like arugula are a great source of vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals, such as magnesium, folate (vitamin B9), lutein, and beta-carotene.

      

    Strawberries for Polyphenols

    Berries, particularly strawberries, and raspberries, are rich in polyphenols known as Hydroxybenzoic acids. These compounds undergo metabolism by colonic bacteria after ingestion—resulting in beneficial metabolites.

    Mint for Medicinal Properties

    Mint is considered a medicinal plant that exhibits multiple health-beneficial properties such as prevention of cancer development and anti-obesity, anti-inflammatory, and so on. Mint oil has antimicrobial potential against Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and others. Mint is enriched with caffeic acid, a compound synthesized by all plant species with anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic activity.

    Leeks for Prebiotics

    Raw leeks, garlic, and onions are a source of prebiotics. Prebiotics, a type of fiber, are good for our beneficial gut bacteria. They assist in balancing the bacteria, which aids in a healthy digestive system. Leeks are an excellent source of vitamin K and a good source of vitamin A and manganese.

    Artichokes for Fiber, Vitamins, and Minerals

    Artichokes are low in fat while rich in fiber, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Particularly high in folate and vitamin C, they also supply important minerals such as magnesium, phosphorus, and potassium. Artichoke leaf extract may have a positive effect on cholesterol levels. A large review in over 700 people found that supplementing with artichoke leaf extract daily for 5–13 weeks reduced total and LDL (bad) cholesterol. Artichokes are a great source of fiber, which can help keep your digestive system healthy.

    Eating seasonally is another important aspect of nurturing your microbiome. When we eat seasonally, we consume naturally available foods during that time of year. This means we eat fresher, more nutritious foods often grown locally and require less preservatives and processing. By eating seasonally, we can also support the diversity of our gut microbiome, as our gut bacteria can adapt to the changing seasonal diets.

    Adding these 9 Spring Inputs to your diet can provide various nutritional benefits and promote a healthy gut microbiome. Don’t forget also to prioritize eating seasonally to boost your gut health. And with Seed Daily’s month-long sale of 20% off on all their products with code VALERIEA20, now is the perfect time to invest in your gut health. So nourish your body from the inside out and feel your best this spring season!

    What Science Says When It Comes To Eating Seasonally and Gut Health

    When researchers compared the microbial profiles of industrialized populations to those of hunter-gatherer communities like the Hazda, they discovered that the most seasonally dynamic bacteria in the Hadza microbiota were rare or absent, regardless of season, in “modernized” humans. In the “dry season,” when the Hazda consumed more meat, their gut microbiomes showed enrichment in enzymes associated with animal carbohydrates. This means the microbial community present during the “dry season” might be better equipped to break down and use animal carbohydrates when animal consumption is at its highest in the year.

    By eating seasonally, we can introduce more diversity to our gut microbiome, which is essential for good health. Eating a diverse range of fruits and vegetables that are in season not only ensures optimal nutrient intake but also provides the gut with diverse prebiotic fibers that feed beneficial gut bacteria.

    Incorporating seasonal foods into your diet is an easy and enjoyable way to support your gut health. By including various in-season fruits, vegetables, and herbs, you can provide your gut with the nutrients and prebiotics it needs to maintain a healthy balance of bacteria. So why not embrace the bounty of the Spring season and start enjoying the delicious and nutritious benefits of seasonal eating?

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    The Importance of Eating Seasonally for a Healthy Gut Microbiome

    The gut microbiome, the complex ecosystem of microorganisms that inhabit our digestive tracts, is crucial for overall health and well-being. Recent research suggests that one way to support a healthy gut microbiome is by eating seasonally. Let’s explore why.

    Disruption of Natural Fluctuations

    Our modern lifestyle has disrupted the natural fluctuations that our gut microbiome once experienced. With year-round access to most produce and increased consumption of packaged and processed foods, our gut bacteria may not be as dynamic as they were for our hunter-gatherer ancestors. In the past, seasonal food availability was the norm, and people relied on it to meet their nutritional needs.


     

     


    Seasonal Shifts in Diet

    Studies have shown that seasonal shifts in diet can impact the microbiome’s functional capacity or what the microbiome can do. For example, the Hazda people of Tanzania consume more meat during the “dry season,” and their gut microbiomes show enrichment in enzymes associated with animal carbohydrates. This suggests that the microbial community present during the “dry season” might be better equipped to break down and use animal carbohydrates when animal consumption is at its highest in the year.

    Comparison of Microbial Profiles

    When researchers compared the microbial profiles of hunter-gatherer populations like the Hazda to industrialized populations, they found that the most seasonally dynamic bacteria in the Hazda microbiota were rare or absent in “modernized” humans, regardless of the season. This suggests our modern lifestyle has disrupted our gut microbiome’s natural fluctuations and diversity.

    Eating Seasonally to Restore Diversity

    By eating seasonally, we can help restore some of the cyclical shifts we once had and improve our ability to utilize what we consume. Eating locally grown produce and foods that are naturally available during a particular season can help support the diversity of our gut bacteria and promote a healthy gut microbiome.

    Not Just for Health, But Environment Too

    Eating seasonally is not only beneficial for our health but also for the environment and local agriculture. By supporting local farmers and consuming food in season, we reduce the environmental impact of transporting foods across long distances and help sustain local ecosystems.

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    Seed Daily’s Products: Supporting Digestive Health Month

    As we celebrate Digestive Health Month, Seed Daily offers a month-long sale on all their products on Seed.com. If you’re interested in investing in your gut health, now is the perfect opportunity to try out Seed Daily’s products at a discount of 20% on your entire purchase using the code VALERIEA20.

    Let’s look closer at Seed Daily’s products, including Seed Probiotic and Seed Symbiotic, specifically designed to support a healthy gut microbiome and improve digestion.

    The Benefits of Seed Probiotic

    Seed Probiotic is an expertly formulated product that contains 24 strains of probiotics that have been clinically studied and shown to support gut health, immune function, and overall wellness. This supplement has been designed to help replenish and maintain the microbiome’s health.

    Probiotics are live microorganisms found in the body, especially in the gut, and can provide numerous health benefits when consumed in adequate amounts. These microorganisms are responsible for several functions, such as breaking down and absorbing nutrients, supporting the immune system, and preventing harmful bacteria from colonizing the gut.

    Seed Probiotic is vegan, gluten-free, and non-GMO, making it an excellent option for people with dietary restrictions. By taking Seed Probiotic, you can support your microbiome’s health, leading to better digestion, immunity, and overall health.

    Gut Microbiome Foods: 9 Seasonal Choices 9+Seasonal+Foods+to+Nurture+Your+Gut+Microbiome

    The Benefits of Seed Symbiotic

    Seed Symbiotic is a two-in-one formula that combines prebiotics and probiotics to promote a healthy gut microbiome and improve digestion. Prebiotics are a type of fiber that feeds the good bacteria in the gut, helping them to grow and multiply. On the other hand, probiotics are live microorganisms that provide numerous health benefits to the host when consumed in adequate amounts.

    Seed Symbiotic contains both prebiotics and probiotics, making it an effective supplement for promoting the growth of beneficial gut bacteria while helping to keep harmful bacteria at bay. This supplement also contains other ingredients, such as digestive enzymes and postbiotics, which provide additional support for digestive health.

     



     

    Seed Symbiotic is vegan, gluten-free, and non-GMO, making it an excellent option for people with dietary restrictions. Taking Seed Symbiotic can support your microbiome’s health, leading to better digestion, immunity, and overall health.

    Investing in your gut health is essential, especially during Digestive Health Month. Seed Daily’s month-long sale provides a fantastic opportunity to try out their products and support your gut health. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to promote a healthy gut microbiome and improve your overall wellness.


    Research Sources

    At Wellness Bum, we lead with research and science-backed information to help educate our readers. This article was carefully researched. Here are some sources that can be credited to the article:

    1. Seed Daily – https://seed.com/

    2. International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics consensus statement on the scope and appropriate use of the term probiotic – https://www.nature.com/articles/nrgastro.2014.66

    3. International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) consensus statement on the definition and scope of prebiotics – https://www.nature.com/articles/nrgastro.2017.75

    4. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics – https://www.eatright.org/health/wellness/healthy-aging/digestive-health

    5. David, L. A., Maurice, C. F., Carmody, R. N., Gootenberg, D. B., Button, J. E., Wolfe, B. E., … & Biddinger, S. B. (2014). Diet rapidly and reproducibly alters the human gut microbiome. Nature, 505(7484), 559-563.

    6. Smits, S. A., Leach, J., Sonnenburg, E. D., Gonzalez, C. G., Lichtman, J. S., Reid, G., … & Sonnenburg, J. L. (2017). Seasonal cycling in the gut microbiome of the Hadza hunter-gatherers of Tanzania. Science, 357(6353), 802-806.

    7. Staudacher, H. M., Whelan, K., & Irving, P. M. (2011). Lactose intolerance and the role of the gut microbiota. Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care, 14(5), 478-484.

    8. Tilg, H., & Kaser, A. (2011). Gut microbiome, obesity, and metabolic dysfunction. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 121(6), 2126-2132.

    9. Martinez, K. B., Leone, V., & Chang, E. B. (2017). Microbial metabolites in health and disease: Navigating the unknown in search of function. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 292(21), 8553-8559.

    10. FoodPrint. (n.d.). Eating Seasonally: A Guide to the Why and How. Retrieved from https://foodprint.org/issues/how-eating-seasonally-can-help-the-planet-and-your-health/

     

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    Hi, I’m Valerie!

    I'm an Integrative Nutrition Health Coach and Registered Yoga Teacher (RYT-200), offering guidance to high achievers in aligning their lifestyle with well-being through daily wellness and self-care routines, promoting balance and harmony. Join me at Wellness Bum for tips on living well, and consider subscribing to my newsletter or booking a coaching session.